Thursday, 24 May 2018

Natalie Lamb and SheffWHO 2018: 6 easy steps for basic contribution in a WHO Simulation

I had never before participated in a simulation event like The Sheffield World Health Organization Simulation 2018. I was really interested in giving it a go for two reasons, during my research I had investigated WHO policy and I was interested in seeing how it was formed and also because the topic was "Outbreaks and Pandemics: Addressing the Next Crisis", an area that is appealing to me, as a microbiologist. 

I found it very difficult to remember what to say in which situation so I have written a script, which can be found below. I think one of the most difficult things to do is always remember to not use first person- it should be "The country representative of XXX". You can only speak if the Chair says you can, which can also be a bit hard at first.


1. Say you are present
Firstly, all the countries will get called to see who is present and who is going to be voting during the session. When your country gets called reply:
"Present and voting"

2. Open a debate
After all the countries have been called, a debate will have to be opened:
"Honorable Chair, Distinguished Delegates. The country representative of XXX would like to motion to open a debate"
There will be a vote where you raise your placard (bit of card with your country name on) to vote for or against.


3. Create an agenda
Then a topic list is formed (i.e. what you are going to be talking about). This topic list cannot be added to so ensure that all the things you want to talk about are included. To add topics to the agenda:
"Honorable Chair, Distinguished Delegates. The country representative of XXX would like to motion to add the topic of XXX to the speaker list"
If the majority votes against it, it will not be added to the topic last and cannot be added to after.


4. Have a formal discussion
When all the topics have been added, it is time to motion for moderated caucus (a formal discussion) about the first idem on the agenda. The person who proposed it would say:
 "Honorable Chair, Distinguished Delegates. The country representative of XXX would like to motion for moderated caucus about XXX for 15 minutes, speaking for 2 minutes"
This means that each person who wishes to talk will have 2 minutes to talk. You can speak more than once in the same moderated caucus but the session will end after 15 minutes (you can select whatever times you would like but the maximum session time is 20 minutes). This will also be voted on. The person who added this to the agenda and has raised it for discussion will have the option to speak first or speak last.


5. End your formal discussion
If you are speaking in moderated caucus and you have excess time left, you must relinquish any spare time, either to the Chair or to another country representative:
"The country representative of XXX would like to surrender the remaining time to the Chair."

6. Extend the formal discussion or have an informal discussion
When the time runs out, there is a choice to either extend the moderated caucus:
"Honorable Chair, Distinguished Delegates. The country representative of XXX would like to motion to extend moderated caucus about XXX for 15 minutes, speaking for 2 minutes"
Or decide that an unmoderated caucus (informal discussion) should be raised
"Honorable Chair, Distinguished Delegates. The country representative of XXX would like to motion to have unmoderated caucus about XXX for 15 minutes"


Bonus
Any time during the session, you can raise your placard. If the Chair says you can speak, you can then say one of the following.
"Honorable Chair, Distinguished Delegates. The country representative of XXX would like to make a..."

  • Point of order- the rules are not being properly followed
  • Point of reply- my country feels attacked by what was just said
  • Point of personal privilege- I can't hear that person
  • Point of inquiry- I'm unsure about something



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